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What Experts and Leaders Say About Public-Private Partnerships

Given the urgent need for infrastructure investment and the effectiveness of public-private partnerships (P3s or PPPs), it is not surprising that many experts and leaders believe P3s should play a crucial role in building our nation’s 21st century infrastructure. Check out Truth from the Tap’s important take aways below!

A RECENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY WHITE PAPER DETAILS HOW P3S EXPAND INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT:

“PPPs bring private sector capital and management expertise to the challenges of modernizing and more efficiently managing such infrastructure assets.”

CALIFORNIA REPRESENTATIVE NORMA TORRES ENCOURAGES LOCAL, STATE, AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS TO WORK TOGETHER WITH PRIVATE WATER COMPANIES TO ADDRESS WATER ISSUES IN HER STATE:

“We should expand public-private partnerships and tap private capital to meet the growing water infrastructure gap.”

THE WHITE HOUSE HAS LAID OUT AN AMBITIOUS PLAN TO INCREASE INVESTMENT IN U.S. ROADS, PORTS AND DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS, WITH P3S BEING A CRUCIAL ELEMENT OF THE PLAN:

“Around the country, towns, cities and states are exploring how to bring innovative financial tools such as public private partnerships to the water sector to get more projects off the ground.”

THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION RELEASED A REPORT ON THE BENEFITS OF USING P3S TO MANAGE PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE:

“PPPs provide access to private sector expertise. Many private sector firms have access to technologies, materials and management techniques that exceed the capabilities of an individual government agency or department. PPPs are one way to harness the ideas and breadth of experience the private sector brings to projects.”

A REPORT BY A SPECIAL PANEL OF THE U.S. HOUSE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE NOTED THAT P3S CAN EFFECTIVELY BALANCE THE NEEDS OF THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR:

“P3 procurements have the potential to deliver certain high-cost, technically complex projects more quickly or in a different manner than would otherwise occur under traditional procurement and financing mechanisms.”

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